EcoFactor launches first commercial service in Texas

July 8, 2010 source CNET Green Tech ‘Smart’ thermostats to get test run in Texas A thermostat technology that’s intended to significantly reduce energy bills is about to become available for use in actual homes.

ecofactor

EcoFactor, the developer of a software platform for a two-way “smart” thermostat, announced Thursday its dynamic system for regulating home heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems will be offered through a pilot project in the Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas, metro area. In addition to turning heat or air conditioning on and off at set times or specified temperatures, the system monitors the thermal behavior of the home, as well as daily outdoor temperatures and weather forecasts. It analyzes the data as well–according to EcoFactor, that includes “24,000 points of data each day from individual homes, local weather stations and numerous other geographic inputs.” EcoFactor has said its program, which requires an Internet connection, can make an HVAC system 20 percent to 30 percent more efficient then a thermostat set by humans alone. [read more]


July 8, 2010 source: EarthTimes Cutting-Edge Home Service Launches First Regional Deployment in Dallas/Ft. Worth Metro [EcoFactor] recently announced $5.9 million in series A venture financing from Claremont Creek Ventures and RockPort Capital. EcoFactor also won the grand prize in the 2009 Open national business competition, the largest of … [read more]


July 8, 2010 source: Sustainable Industries Sustainable Industries Daily Update EcoFactor, a Bay Area startup whose software targets home heating and cooling systems, announced its first commercial service with Texas utility Oncor.


July 7, 2010 source: earth2tech EcoFactor Launches Its First Service in Texas EcoFactor, the 4-year-old startup that makes software that intelligently manages connected thermostats and reduces home energy consumption, has launched its first commercial service for utility Oncor in Texas. Yeehaw. While EcoFactor has been trialling and piloting its service since 2007, Oncor customers in the Dallas and Ft. Worth areas of Texas are now officially the first EcoFactor customers… [read more]


July 7, 2010 source: ZDNet EcoFactor sparks up Texas home program Yes, it’s definitely a week where demand response theory — and technology — is just dying to be tested to thwart power outages. Ironically, it is only 80 degrees right now in Dallas, where a new home energy efficiency service and demand response service is being launched tomorrow by local utility Oncor and technology partner EcoFactor. [read more]


July 7, 2010 source: GreentechGrid EcoFactor Teams Up With Oncor: EcoFactor will bring its home service to the Dallas/Ft. Worth area. Forget about empowering the customer with information or tailoring solutions to the individual — EcoFactor wants to do all the work on their end to help homeowners slash their energy use. EcoFactor is taking its award-winning home system to the Dallas/Ft. Worth Metroplex area by teaming up with Oncor’s “Take A Load Off, Texas” energy efficiency program. [read more]


July 7, 2010 source: VentureBeat EcoFactor rolls out first energy efficient thermostat service in Texas EcoFactor, maker of software that turns programmable thermostats into smart, energy-efficient devices, has just launched its first commercial deployment in Dallas and Ft. Worth with Texan utility Oncor. The startup’s service allows thermostats to modulate temperatures for comfort while simultaneously shaving energy demand and customers’ energy bills. After EcoFactor is installed, all homeowners have to do is adjust their thermostats as usual for several days. The software remembers what they like, in relation to seasons, weather conditions and square footage, so that they never have to worry about it again. EcoFactor’s software adjusts home temperature in real time as conditions change. [read more]


July 7, 2010 source: Dallas Morning News New thermostat system lets you have your favorite temperature and pay less for it, too A California company, in partnership with Oncor, will launch a new service in North Texas Wednesday to cut home energy use as much as 15 percent without changing the home’s temperature. For $19.95, EcoFactor will install a thermostat in your home. You control the temperature, and the company manipulates the way your air conditioner and heater reach that temperature to cut energy use. Also Online EcoFactor founders say they can reduce the average household utility costs by $300 to $400 a year. “We consider ourselves like the cruise control on your car,” said EcoFactor chief executive John Steinberg.  [read more]


July 7, 2010 source: WFAA-TV Remote-controlled thermostat promises power savings When the sun shines brightly, thermostats go into overdrive. But as part of the “Take a Load Off, Texas” program, Oncor is introducing the EcoFactor thermostat. The private company behind it promises to cut 20 to 30 percent off your annual power bill by tweaking the temperature in your home throughout the day. “So if the utility says we’re going to charge you a lot of money at 4 p.m. in the afternoon, we’ll pre-cool your house before that using cheaper electricity,” explained EcoFactor founder John Steinberg. It works like this: Consumers set the temperature, and Steinberg’s company makes small changes to the thermostat by remote control throughout the day. “Just like the cruise control in your car, you’ve set the speeds you’ve told it to set, and then it makes small adjustments to the gas pedal to maintain that speed,” Steinberg said. “We make adjustments throughout the day upon the preferences you’ve told us.” [read more]


July 7, 2010 source: KRLD Radio A California company is joining forces with Oncor to roll out a new interactive thermostat that promises a reduction in utility costs. John Steinberg with EcoFactor tells KRLD for 19.99 for the first six months and 8.99 per month after that, they’ll install a 2-way thermostat system that learns from your heating and cooling habits. Steinberg says the average homeowner could save between $200 and $300 a year with the system. Although it’s hooked up to a network, Steinberg says homeowners will still have complete control of their thermostats.